Useful Information

Banks and foreign exchange in SA

With a favourable exchange rate for many international currencies, you'll find South Africa a very inexpensive destination. And an easy one – our financial institutions are world-class, with no shortage of banks, bureaux de change and automatic tellers.

Rands and cents


South Africa's unit of currency is the rand, which is divided into 100 cents. Coins come in denominations of 5c, 10c, 20c, 50c, R1, R2 and R5, and notes in denominations of R10, R20, R50, R100 and R200.

How far will my money go?

A long, long way. With a favourable exchange rate for the major international currencies, you'll find South Africa a very inexpensive destination.

• For the latest exchange rates, see the "market indicators" box on the right.

Banking made easy

You'll also find South Africa an easy destination. From the moment you step off the plane you'll start seeing banks, bureaux de change and automatic tellers all over.

The banks are generally open from 9am to 3.30pm Mondays through Fridays, and 8.30am to 11am on Saturdays, but those at the airports adjust their hours to accommodate international flights.

The major banks have branches as well as automated teller machines (ATMs) in most large towns – and all over the cities. International banks (see the "foreign exchange services" links below) have branches in the major cities. Thomas Cook (represented by Rennies Travel) and American Express foreign exchange offices are also available in the major cities.

Credit cards and cash

All major credit cards can be used in South Africa, with American Express and Diners Club enjoying less universal acceptance than MasterCard and Visa. In some small towns, you may find you'll need to use cash. When it comes to paying for fuel, you may also have to pay cash.

Our filling stations can now take credit card payments – regulations allowing them to do so came into effect in July 2009. However, many filling stations (or garages, as we call them) may take a while to adjust, or may choose not to. Look out for the "cash only" notices.

Many locals have special fuel credit cards, known as garage or petrol cards, for use only at filling stations. These will still be accepted.

Road tolls, on the major routes between cities, can be paid using MasterCard or Visa.

LINKS

Credit cards and related services

• American Express South Africa
• Diners Club South Africa
• MasterCard South Africa
• Visa South Africa

South Africa's 'big four' banks

• Absa Bank
• First National Bank
• Nedbank
• Standard Bank

Foreign exchange services

These and other financial services are offered by SA's "big four" banks as well as the credit card firms listed above. Other foreign exchange dealers in South Africa include the following:

• ABN AMRO South Africa
• Bank of Baroda (SA branch)
• Bank of China (SA branch)
• Bank of Taiwan (SA branch)
• Barclays Bank South Africa
• Bidvest Bank/Rennies Foreign Exchange
• Calyon Corporate Bank (SA branch)
• China Construction Bank Johannesburg
• Citibank South Africa
• Commerzbank (SA branch)
• Deutsche Bank (SA branch)
• HBZ Bank South Africa
• HSBC South Africa
• Investec South Africa
• JPMorgan Chase (SA branch)
• Master Currency
• Meeg Bank
• Mercantile Bank
• SociétéGénérale (SA branch)
• South African Bank of Athens
• Standard Chartered Bank South Africa
• State Bank of India, South Africa • Tower Foreign Exchange

Read more: http://www.southafrica.info/travel/

Safety Tips

Crime in South Africa, like many other places in today's world, can be a problem, but all you really need to do is take the usual sensible precautions and follow some basic safety rules. Know where you're going before you set off, particularly at night, watch your possessions, don't walk alone in dodgy areas, lock your doors at night. And, like anywhere else, there are some areas of the major cities which are known to be more risky than others. It is easy to avoid these and still have a good time. If you cannot avoid such areas, then avoid wearing visible jewellery or carrying cameras and bags over your shoulder. Keep mobile phones and wallets tucked away where no one can see them. Check beforehand that the areas you plan to visit are safe by asking hotel staff or police. Other sensible advice is not to hitchhike, or accept or carry items for strangers.

Vehicle safety

When driving a private vehicle, either borrowed or hired, in South Africa, take some simple precautions to avoid car hijackings or "smash-and-grabs". As a driver, be on the alert when coming to a halt at traffic lights or stop streets, as well as when arriving at or leaving any premises. Car doors should always be locked, and valuables are better kept in the boot or under the seats. Plan your route beforehand.

When parking at night, choose well-lit or security-patrolled parking areas. Street security guards will usually ask whether they can watch over your car, and in return should be paid a small fee – anything from two rand upwards.

ATM safety

When using automatic teller machines (ATMs) in South Africa, practice the generally accepted safety precautions you would employ when at home. Never accept an offer from a stranger to help you with your transaction. If your ATM card is withheld by the machine, you can approach the bank to release it, or call the helpline number that can be found at the ATM.

Lost passports

In case you lose your passport, report the loss as soon as possible to the South African Police Service, as well as to your country's embassy or consulate in South Africa (alphabetical country listing):

Health tips for travellers

Nothing can spoil a holiday more than feeling off-colour, and nothing can dull the pleasure of your holiday memories more than getting ill far from home. There are a number of health issues that you should be aware of, particularly if you're from the northern hemisphere.

However, while there are risks anywhere, South Africa has a relatively salubrious climate and our levels of water treatment, hygiene and such make it a pretty safe destination.

• More information, service, alerts and advice: Netcare Travel Clinics

Inoculations

If you're an adult, you won't need any inoculations unless you're travelling from a yellow-fever endemic area (the yellow fever belt of Africa or South America), in which case you will need certification to prove your inoculation status when you arrive in South Africa.

It is recommended that you have the required inoculations four to six weeks before you travel to South Africa (a yellow fever inoculation certificate only becomes valid 10 days after inoculation - after which it remains valid for 10 years).

Hepatitis B inoculations are recommended for children up to the age of 12 who have not completed the series of injections as infants. Booster doses for tetanus and measles can also be administered.

Medical facilities

Medical facilities in cities and larger towns are world-class, but you will find that in rural areas the clinics and hospitals deal with primary health needs, and therefore do not offer the range of medical care that the large metropolitan hospitals do. Trained medical caregivers are deployed round the country, so help is never far away.

The sun

We have a warm sunny climate and sunscreen and a hat are recommended whenever you are out of doors during the day, particularly between 10:00 and 16:00, regardless of whether there is cloud cover or not.

Even if you have a dark complexion, you can still get sunburned if you are from a cooler climate and have not had much exposure to the sun. Sunglasses are also recommended wear, as the glare of the African sun can be strong.

Can I drink the water?

High-quality tap (faucet) water is available almost everywhere in South Africa, treated so as to be free of harmful micro-organisms, and in any area other than informal or shack settlements, is both palatable and safe to drink straight from the tap.

In some areas, the water is mineral-rich, and you may experience a bit of gastric distress for a day or two until you get used to it. Bottled mineral water, both sparkling and still, is readily available in most places.

Drinking water straight from rivers and streams could put you at risk of waterborne diseases - especially downstream of human settlements. The water in mountain streams, however, is usually pure and wonderful.

In the Cape, particularly, the water contains humic acid, which stains it the colour of diluted Coca-Cola - this is absolutely harmless, and the water is wonderful. You may also find this colouring in tap water in some areas. It's fine - it just looks a bit weird in the bath.

Do I need to take malaria tablets?

Many of the main tourist areas are malaria-free, so you need not worry at all. However, the Kruger National Park, the Lowveld of Mpumalanga and Limpopo, and the northern part of KwaZulu-Natal do pose a malaria risk in the summer months.

Many local people and some travellers do not take malaria prophylaxis, but most health professionals recommend you do. Consult your doctor or a specialist travel clinic for the latest advice concerning malaria prophylaxis, as it changes regularly.

Whether you take oral prophylaxis or not, always use mosquito repellent, wear long pants, closed shoes and light long-sleeved shirts at night, and sleep under a mosquito net in endemic areas (the anopheles mosquito, which carries malaria, operates almost exclusively after dark). It is advisable to avoid malarial areas if you are pregnant.

• More information: Netcare Travel Clinics: Malaria

HIV/Aids

As in other countries, always take precautions when having sex. South Africa has one of the highest rates of HIV in the world. Read more:

http://www.southafrica.info/travel/